Rose and Shakespeare

Juliet: “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet.”  Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2) – Shakespeare

Shakespeare referred to the Rose over 70 times.  It is the most expressed flower in his works.  Varieties mentioned included the Musk Rose (Rosa moschata), the Damask Rose (Rosa damascena), the Eglantine or Sweet Briar (Rosa rubiginosa), the Provence or Cabbage Rose (Rosa centifolia) and the Wild Dog Rose (Rosa canina).

The Rose is the national emblem of England since the War of the Roses during the years 1455 through 1485; the royal houses of York and Lancaster fought for the crown.  The Red Rose was the insignia of the House of Lancaster and the White Rose was that of the House of York.  The two houses were finally united with the marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York and the two flowers were joined to form the Tudor Rose:

IMG_0461_25600316195639

Here are some more of Shakespeare’s mention of the Rose:

“Of all flowers

Methinks a rose is best.”

– Two Noble Kinsmen, Act II, Scene II

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

“With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine:

There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,

Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight.”

– A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act II, Scene I

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Roses will live on; roses will be eternal; roses will still be there even after we move on – with their splendor so stoic, so enduring (MZ not Shakespeare 🙂 )

IMG_0445_25600315210417IMG_1630_20161023230235IMG_8597

 

 

2 thoughts on “Rose and Shakespeare

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: